Are you ready for Eclipse 2017? We are!

Are you ready for Eclipse 2017?  We are!

Some of our GPS Corporate staff are ready for the Solar Eclipse 2017!

GPS gave out FREE solar eclipse glasses to our staff and associates.  Thank you Experience Columbia SC for making it so easy to order our NASA approved eclipse glasses early in the year!  Please refer to our Facebook pages (Gallman Personnel Services, Inc. and Gallman Consulting) for viewing locations, viewing tips, etc.

GPS Branch Closures

GPS Branches in South Carolina will be closing at 12pm on Monday, August 21 to ensure our staff members can make arrangements with their families to view the Eclipse safely as possible.

 

Pictured above from left to right is Terri Stone (Accounting), Sue Ellison (Accounting), Barbara Greene (Safety), Georgette Sandifer (Gallman Consulting), Karen Smith (Human Resources).  And these ladies are all ready for the Eclipse. Are you?

GPS branches in South Carolina will close at 12:00pm on Monday, August 21, 2017.

Please reference below information to ensure the safety of your Eclipse experience.

 

DON’T GO BLIND AUGUST 21, 2017!

Total Solar Eclipse:

Newberry, SC approximate time 1:11pm–4:05pm (max view 2:41pm)
Columbia, SC approximate time 1:13pm–4:06pm (max view 2:43pm)
Orangeburg, SC approximate time 1:14pm–4:07pm (max view 2:44pm)
Charleston, SC approximate time 1:16pm–4:09pm (max view 2:47pm)

It should go without saying that it’s dangerous to stare into the sun. But so long as you trust NASA, the American Optometric Association, and many other experts who’ve dedicated their lives to understanding how the sun and your peepers work: You can look directly at the total phase of a solar eclipse (and only the “total” phase where the sun is completely covered by the moon) with the naked eye without causing eye damage. Problem is, the total phase only lasts a couple of minutes, but people likely will want to watch from the partial phase which lasts much longer. From start to finish on all phases, an eclipse lasts about three hours — so more than two and half of those hours spent watching could pose a serious risk to unprotected eyes.

You’re going to need something more powerful than a pair of polarized sunglasses if you want to safely block out those harmful rays.

Aug. 21, 2017, may be one of the worst traffic days in national history, some NASA representatives predict. Although about 12 million people live within the narrow band of totality, approximately 25 million reside within a day’s drive of it, and the agency has estimated that the population inside the path of totality may double on the day of the eclipse.

With that in mind, make sure you plan for extra travel time, especially on the day of the eclipse. Most hotel rooms inside the path of totality have been booked for months or years, so you may not be able to stay inside the path the night before.  Traveling even short distances could be difficult in some areas, and midday in the middle of August can mean punishing heat in many parts of the country.

 

 

** DISCLAIMER: This pair of eclipse viewing glasses is provided as is without any guarantees or warranty. In association with the product, GPS makes no warranties of any kind, either express or implied, including but not limited to warranties of merchantability, fitness for a viewing purposes, of title, or of noninfringement of third party rights. Use of the product by a user is at the user’s risk. GPS is not responsible for any injuries suffered by viewing of any eclipse. **

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